Thinking about writing

I'm looking again at traffic to my site and how I write. A few years ago I realized I had a "ratchet" problem. My first articles were less polished, and I felt good publishing them. When I got better at writing, my newer articles were more polished, but I would hesitate to publish. I didn't want to publish until I got everything just right. And as a result I've been publishing less and less the last few years.

Why didn't I want to publish until I got everything right? I didn't want a traffic spike to occur and for lots of people to see my unpolished page:

Pageviews for my hexagonal grids page

The trouble is that all the metrics shown in the charts make those traffic spikes look very important. But this cumulative sum chart makes those traffic spikes look unimportant:

Cumulative pageviews for my hexagonal grid page

The spikes feel good. HEY I got on reddit! But they don't seem that important in the grand scheme of things. Most of my visitors come from day to day visits, not from the spikes. And that means my trying to make sure everything's polished before I put it up may be unnecessary. A friend of mine says I should treat my pages like wikipedia. The cumulative traffic graph supports that.

A few years ago I gave myself an “out” by having "x" pages that were less polished. They were blog entries. They were “fire and forget” pages that I would publish, unpolished, and not update. It worked. I published a lot more. I really liked publishing every few weeks instead of every few months.

The trouble was that it was too easy of an out. I ended up publishing almost everything as "x" pages the last two years, and I think it took away from my regular pages. In particular, the "x" pages let me get away with not iterating. I didn't update them after I posted. And they didn't get better. And then they got very little traffic.

If my pages are like wikipedia I should be putting up incomplete unpolished pages earlier and then refining them over time.

So this year I want to publish more often but more importantly iterate more after I publish. I can treat the early viewers as beta testers. It's the “launch early” philosophy from startup culture (minimum viable product, etc.). I tell other people to do this but I haven't been practicing what I preached.

Take a look at my Trello page to see the kinds of things I want to work on.

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